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Regulatory Compliance News

Regulatory Compliance News | Shapiro

Free Trade Agreements (FTAs)

Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) have emerged as a key driving force behind global economic integration, facilitating the flow of goods and services across borders. FTAs remove barriers to trade, such as tariffs and quotas, enabling countries to access new markets and expand their export opportunities. One of the most notable examples is the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which transformed trade relations between the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

It facilitated the seamless movement of goods, encouraged investment, and boosted economic integration between the 3 countries.  Interested in learning more about the litany of trade agreements across the globe? Check them out below.  


Global Free Trade Agreements




Benefits of Free Trade Agreements (FTAs)

  1. Boosting International Trade: FTAs promote a surge in international trade by reducing trade barriers, leading to an increase in imports and exports between participating nations. This opens new markets for businesses and stimulates economic growth.
  2. Attracting Foreign Investment: Countries with FTAs become more attractive to foreign investors due to improved market access, reduced risks, and enhanced business predictability. This influx of foreign direct investment contributes to economic development and job creation.
  3. Competitive Advantage: Businesses within countries engaged in FTAs gain a competitive advantage by accessing cheaper inputs and raw materials, which ultimately reduces production costs and increases competitiveness in the global market.
  4. Innovation and Technology Transfer: FTAs facilitate the transfer of technology and innovation between nations, enabling less-developed countries to acquire new knowledge and improve their productivity.
  5. Consumer Benefits: With reduced tariffs, consumers can access a wider range of goods and services at more competitive prices, enhancing their purchasing power and quality of life.

How FTAs Impact Different Sectors

Free trade agreements (FTAs) have a significant impact on various sectors of economies by influencing trade dynamics, market access, and economic cooperation. It’s important to take note of the export opportunities or challenges that could affect your industry or business.

  • Agriculture: FTAs can lead to increased agricultural exports, benefiting farmers and agribusinesses. However, domestic industries may face competition from cheaper imports.
  • Manufacturing: Manufacturing industries often witness growth due to access to new markets and competitive input prices, but some sectors may experience competition from foreign manufacturers.
  • Services: FTAs promote the liberalization of services, allowing service providers to tap into new markets and create a more conducive environment for cross-border service trade.

Notable Free Trade Agreements

Here’s a list of official FTAs between countries aimed at promoting trade by reducing or eliminating barriers such as tariffs and quotas. These agreements facilitate the exchange of goods and services, encourage investment, and foster economic cooperation. Notable FTAs include:

  • North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA): A landmark agreement between Canada, Mexico, and the United States, which has recently been replaced by the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).
  • European Union-United Kingdom Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA): Formed after Brexit, this agreement governs trade relations between the EU and the UK.
  • Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP): Involving 11 Pacific Rim countries, this agreement aims to enhance economic integration among member states.

Free Trade Agreements play a vital role in promoting economic growth, enhancing international trade, and providing numerous benefits to participating countries and businesses alike. By reducing trade barriers and fostering cooperation, FTAs pave the way for a more interconnected and prosperous global economy, fostering a win-win situation for all stakeholders involved.



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Know Your AD/CVDs

AD/CVD rulings involve the imposition of anti-dumping (AD) and countervailing duties (CVD) on imported goods deemed to be sold below fair market value or benefiting from foreign government subsidies. These measures aim to protect domestic industries from unfair trade practices and level the playing field in international commerce.

FY2024 Q1

On January 19, 2024, the Department of Commerce announced the initiation of the Antidumping Duty Investigation for Certain Wine Bottles from Chile, China, and Mexico and Countervailing Duty Investigation for Certain Wine Bottles from China.

  • The merchandise covered by the investigations is certain narrow neck glass bottles, with a nominal capacity of 750 milliliters (25.36 ounces), consistent with the authorized standards of fill in 27 C.F.R. § 4.72;
  • a nominal total height between 24.8 centimeters (9.75 inches) to 35.6 centimeters (14 inches);
  • a nominal base diameter between 4.6 centimeters (1.8 inches) to 11.4 centimeters (4.5 inches);
  • a nominal base diameter between 4.6 centimeters (1.8 inches) to 11.4 centimeters (4.5 inches);
  • and a mouth with an outer diameter of between 25 millimeters (.98 inches) to 37.9 millimeters (1.5 inches); frequently referred to as a “wine bottle.”
  • In scope merchandise may include but is not limited to the following shapes:
    • Bordeaux (also known as “Claret”)
    • Burgundy
    • Champagne, or
    • Sparkling
  • In scope glass bottles generally have an approximately round base and have shapes including but not limited to:
    • straight-sided,
    • a tapered slope from shoulder (i.e., the sloping part of the bottle between the neck and the body) to base,
    • or a long neck with sloping shoulders to a wider base.
  • The scope includes glass bottles, whether clear or colored, with or without a punt (i.e., an indentation on the underside of the bottle), and with or without design or functional enhancements (including, but not limited to, embossing, labeling, or etching).
  • In scope merchandise may be imported with or without a closure, including a cork, stelvin (screw cap), crown cap, or wire cage and cork closure.
  • Excluded from the scope of the investigations are:
    • Glass containers made of borosilicate glass, meeting United States Pharmacopeia requirements for Type 1 pharmaceutical containers;
    • Glass containers produced by the “free blown” method or otherwise without the use of a mold (i.e., without “mold seams,” “joint marks,” or “parting lines”); and
    • Glass containers without a “finish” (i.e., the section of a container at the opening including the lip and ring or collar, threaded or otherwise compatible with a type of closure, including but not limited to a cork, stelvin (screw cap), crown cap, or wire cage and cork closure).
  • In the Antidumping Duty Investigation, the preliminary determinations are due by June 6, 2024.
  • In the Countervailing Duty Investigations, the preliminary determinations are due by March 24, 2024.

FY2023 Q4

On October 25, 2023. A petition was file to initiate an Antidumping duty investigation on Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Ecuador and Indonesia as well as a Countervailing duty investigation on Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Ecuador, India, Indonesia, and Vietnam.

  • The announcement has not been published in the Federal Register yet. Please see the United States International Trade Commission Notice of the Institution of Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase Investigations.
  • The below is the proposed scope that was submitted in the petition.
  • The scope of these investigations includes certain frozen warmwater shrimp and prawns whether wild-caught (ocean harvested) or farm-raised (produced by aquaculture), head-on or head-off, shell-on or peeled, tail-on or tail-off,25 deveined or not deveined, cooked or raw, or otherwise processed in frozen form.
  • The frozen warmwater shrimp and prawn products included in the scope, regardless of definitions in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), are products which are processed from warmwater shrimp and prawns through freezing and which are sold in any count size.
  • The products described above may be processed from any species of warmwater shrimp and prawns. Warmwater shrimp and prawns are generally classified in, but are not limited to, the Penaeidae family. Some examples of the farmed and wild-caught warmwater species include, but are not limited to, whiteleg shrimp (Penaeus vannemei), banana prawn (Penaeus merguiensis), fleshy prawn (Penaeus chinensis), giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), giant tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon), redspotted shrimp (Penaeus brasiliensis), southern brown shrimp (Penaeus subtilis), southern pink shrimp (Penaeus notialis), southern rough shrimp (Trachypenaeus curvirostris), southern white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis), and Indian white prawn (Penaeus indicus).
  • Frozen shrimp and prawns that are packed with marinade, spices or sauce are included in the scope. In addition, food preparations, which are not “prepared meals,” that contain more than 20 percent by weight of shrimp or prawn are also included in the scope.
  • Excluded from the scope are:
    1. breaded shrimp and prawns (HTSUS subheading 1605.20.10.20).
    2. shrimp and prawns generally classified in the Pandalidae family and commonly referred to as coldwater shrimp, in any state of processing.
    3. fresh shrimp and prawns whether shell-on or peeled (HTSUS subheadings 0306.36.0020 and 0306.36.0040).
    4. shrimp and prawns in prepared meals (HTSUS subheading 1605.20.05.10).
    5. dried shrimp and prawns.
    6. canned warmwater shrimp and prawns (HTSUS subheading 1605.20.10.40).
    7. certain dusted shrimp; and
    8. certain battered shrimp. Dusted shrimp is a shrimp-based product:
      1. that is produced from fresh (or thawed-from-frozen) and peeled shrimp;
      2. to which a “dusting” layer of rice or wheat flour of at least 95 percent purity has been applied;
      3. with the entire surface of the shrimp flesh thoroughly and evenly coated with the flour;
      4. with the nonshrimp content of the end product constituting between four and 10 percent of the product’s total weight after being dusted, but prior to being frozen; and
      5. that is subjected to IQF freezing immediately after application of the dusting layer. Battered shrimp is a shrimp-based product that, when dusted in accordance with the definition of dusting above, is coated with a wet viscous layer containing egg and/or milk, and par-fried.
  • The products covered by the scope are currently classified under the following HTSUS subheadings: 0306.17.0004, 0306.17.0005, 0306.17.0007, 0306.17.0008, 0306.17.0010, 0306.17.0011, 0306.17.0013, 0306.17.0014, 0306.17.0016, 0306.17.0017, 0306.17.0019, 0306.17.0020, 0306.17.0022, 0306.17.0023, 0306.17.0025, 0306.17.0026, 0306.17.0028, 0306.17.0029, 0306.17.0041, 0306.17.0042, 1605.21.1030, and 1605.29.1010. These HTSUS subheadings are provided for convenience and for customs purposes only and are not dispositive, but rather the written description of the scope is dispositive.
  • The determination if the investigations will be initiated are due by November 14, 2023.
  • If the investigations are initiated, the preliminary determination in the Antidumping investigation is due on April 2, 2024, and on January 18, 2024, in the Countervailing Investigation.

On October 13, 2023, a petition was filed to initiate anti-dumping duties on Truck and Bus Tires from Thailand.

  • The announcement of filing of the petition has not been published in the Federal Register. Please see the below for reference.
  • The scope of the investigation covers truck and bus tires. Truck and bus tires are new pneumatic tires, of rubber, with a truck or bus size designation. Truck and bus tires covered by the scope may be tube-type, tubeless, radial, or non-radial.
  • Subject tires have, at the time of importation, the symbol “DOT” on the sidewall, certifying that the tire conforms to applicable motor vehicle safety standards. Subject tires may also have one of the following suffixes in their tire size designation, which also appear on the sidewall of the tire:
  • TR—Identifies tires for service on trucks or buses to differentiate them from similarly sized passenger car and light truck tires; and
  • HC—Identifies a 17.5 inch rim diameter code for use on low platform trailers.
  • All tires with a “TR” or “HC” suffix in their size designations are covered by the scope regardless of their intended use.
  • All tires with a “TR” or “HC” suffix in their size designations are covered by the scope regardless of their intended use.
  • In addition, all tires that lack one of the above suffix markings, as well as all tires that include any other prefix or suffix in their sidewall markings, are included in the scope, regardless of their intended use, as long as the tire is of a size that fits trucks or buses. Sizes that fit trucks and buses include, but are not limited to, the numerical size designations listed in the “Truck- Bus” section of the Tire and Rim Association Year Book, as updated annually. The scope includes all tires that are of a size that fits trucks or buses, unless the tire falls within one of the specific exclusions set out below.
  • Truck and bus tires, whether or not mounted on wheels or rims, are included in the scope.
  • However, if a subject tire is imported mounted on a wheel or rim, only the tire is covered by the scope. Subject merchandise includes truck and bus tires produced in the subject country whether mounted on wheels or rims in the subject country or in a third country. Truck and bus tires are covered whether or not they are accompanied by other parts, e.g., a wheel, rim, axle parts, bolts, nuts, etc. Truck and bus tires that enter attached to a vehicle are not covered by the scope.
  • Specifically excluded from the scope are the following types of tires:
  • (1) Pneumatic tires, of rubber, that are not new, including recycled and retreaded tires;
  • (2) non-pneumatic tires, such as solid rubber tires; and
  • (3) tires that exhibit each of the following physical characteristics:

    (a) The designation “MH” is molded into the tire’s sidewall as part of the size designation;
    (b) the tire incorporates a warning, prominently molded on the sidewall, that the tire is for “Mobile Home Use Only;” and
    (c) the tire is of bias construction as evidenced by the fact that the construction code included in the size designation molded into the tire’s sidewall is not the letter “R.”

  • (4) Tires entered attached to a vehicle.
  • The subject merchandise is currently classifiable under Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”) subheadings: 4011.20.1015 and 4011.20.5020. Tires meeting the scope description may also enter under the following HTSUS subheadings: 4011.90.10, 4011.90.20, 4011.90.80, 8708.70.45, 8708.70.60, and 8716.90.5059.
  • The Department of Commerce must decide by November 26, 2023, is there is sufficient evidence to initiate the antidumping investigation.
  • Compliance will inform affected customers directly.

On October 4, 2023, a petition was filed to initiate Antidumping duties on Aluminum Extrusions from Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Italy, Malaysia, Mexico, China, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Vietnam and Countervailing duties on Aluminum Extrusions from China, Indonesia, Mexico, and Turkey.

  • The announcement has not been published in the Federal Register yet. Please see the United States International Trade Commission Notice of the Institution of Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase Investigations.
  • The below is the proposed scope that was submitted in the petition.
  • The merchandise subject to this investigation is aluminum extrusions, regardless of form, finishing, or fabrication, whether assembled with other parts or unassembled, whether coated, painted, anodized, or thermally improved. Aluminum extrusions are shapes and forms, produced by an extrusion process, made from aluminum alloys having metallic elements corresponding to the alloy series designations published by the Aluminum Association commencing with the numbers 1, 3, and 6 (or proprietary equivalents or other certifying body equivalents).
  • Specifically, subject aluminum extrusions made from an aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series designation commencing with the number 1 contain not less than 99 percent aluminum by weight. Subject aluminum extrusions made from an aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series designation commencing with the number 3 contain manganese as the major alloying element, with manganese accounting for not more than 3.0 percent of total materials by weight. Subject aluminum extrusions made from an aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series designation commencing with the number 6 contain magnesium and silicon as the major alloying elements, with magnesium accounting for at least 0.1 percent but not more than 2.0 percent of total materials by weight, and silicon accounting for at least 0.1 percent but not more than 3.0 percent of total materials by weight.
  • The country of origin of the aluminum extrusion is determined by where the metal is extruded (i.e., pressed through a die). Aluminum extrusions are produced and imported in a wide variety of shapes and forms, including, but not limited to, hollow profiles, other solid profiles, pipes, tubes, bars, and rods.
  • Aluminum extrusions that are drawn subsequent to extrusion (drawn aluminum) are also included in the scope.
  • Subject aluminum extrusions are produced and imported with a variety of coatings and surface treatments, and types of fabrication. The types of coatings and treatments applied to aluminum extrusions include, but are not limited to, extrusions that are mill finished (i.e., without any coating or further finishing), brushed, buffed, polished, anodized (including brightdip), liquid painted, electroplated, chromate converted, powder coated, sublimated, wrapped, and/or bead blasted. Subject aluminum extrusions may also be fabricated, i.e., prepared for assembly, or thermally improved. Such operations would include, but are not limited to, extrusions that are cut-to-length, machined, drilled, punched, notched, bent, stretched, stretch-formed, hydroformed, knurled, swedged, mitered, chamfered, threaded, and spun. Performing such operations in third countries does not otherwise remove the merchandise from the scope of the investigation.
  • The types of products that meet the definition of subject merchandise include but are not limited to, vehicle roof rails and sun/moon roof framing, solar panel racking rails and framing, tradeshow display fixtures and framing, parts for tents or clear span structures, fence posts, drapery rails or rods, electrical conduits, door thresholds, flooring trim, electric vehicle battery trays, heat sinks, signage or advertising poles, picture frames, telescoping poles, or cleaning system components. Heat sinks are included in the scope, regardless of whether the design and production of the heat sinks are organized around meeting specified thermal performance requirements and regardless of whether they have been tested to comply with such requirements.
  • Merchandise that is comprised solely of aluminum extrusions or aluminum extrusions and fasteners, whether assembled at the time of importation or unassembled, is covered by the scope in its entirety.
  • The scope also covers aluminum extrusions that are imported with non-extruded aluminum components beyond fasteners, whether assembled at the time of importation or unassembled, that are designed to be a part or subassembly of a larger product or system. Only the aluminum extrusion portion of the merchandise described in this paragraph, whether assembled or unassembled, is subject to duties. Examples of merchandise that is designed to be a part or subassembly of a larger product or system include, but are not limited to, window parts or subassemblies; door unit parts or subassemblies; shower and bath system parts or subassemblies; solar panel mounting systems; fenestration system parts or subassemblies, such as curtain wall and window wall units and parts or subassemblies of storefronts; furniture parts or subassemblies; appliance parts or subassemblies, such as fin evaporator coils and systems for refrigerators; railing or deck system parts or subassemblies; fence system parts or subassemblies; motor vehicle parts or subassemblies, such as bumpers for motor vehicles; trailer parts or subassemblies, such as side walls, flooring, and roofings; electric vehicle charging station parts or subassemblies; or signage or advertising system parts or subassemblies.
  • The scope excludes assembled merchandise containing non-extruded aluminum components beyond fasteners that is not a part or subassembly of a larger product or system and that is used as imported, without undergoing after importation any processing, fabrication, finishing, or assembly or the addition of parts or material, regardless of whether the additional parts or material are interchangeable. Examples of such excluded assembled merchandise include windows with glass, door units with door panel and glass, motor vehicles, trailers, furniture, appliances, and solar panels.
  • The scope also includes aluminum extrusions that have been further processed in a third country, including, but not limited to, the finishing and fabrication processes described above, assembly, whether with other aluminum extrusion components or with non-aluminum extrusion components, or any other processing that would not otherwise remove the merchandise from the scope if performed in the country of manufacture of the in-scope product. Third-country processing; finishing; and/or fabrication, including those processes described in the scope, does not alter the country of origin of the subject aluminum extrusions.
  • The following aluminum extrusion products are excluded: aluminum extrusions made from an aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series designations commencing with the number 2 (or proprietary equivalents or other certifying body equivalents) and containing in excess of 1.5 percent copper by weight; aluminum extrusions made from an aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series designation commencing with the number 5 (or proprietary equivalents or other certifying body equivalents) and containing in excess of 2.0 percent magnesium by weight; and aluminum extrusions made from an aluminum alloy with an Aluminum Association series designation commencing with the number 7 (or proprietary equivalents or other certifying body equivalents) and containing in excess of 2.0 percent zinc by weight.
  • The scope also excludes aluminum alloy sheet or plates produced by means other than the extrusion process, such as aluminum products produced by a method of continuous casting or rolling. Cast aluminum products are also excluded. The scope also excludes unwrought aluminum in any form.
  • The scope also excludes collapsible tubular containers composed of metallic elements corresponding to alloy code 1080A as designated by the Aluminum Association where the tubular container (excluding the nozzle) meets each of the following dimensional characteristics: (1) length of 37 millimeters (“mm”) or 62 mm, (2) outer diameter of 11.0 mm or 12.7 mm, and (3) wall thickness not exceeding 0.13 mm.
  • Also excluded from the scope of these investigations is certain rectangular wire, imported in bulk rolls or precut strips and produced from continuously cast rolled aluminum wire rod, which is subsequently extruded to dimension to form rectangular wire with or without rounded edges. The product is made from aluminum alloy grade 1070 or 1370, with no recycled metal content allowed. The dimensions of the wire are 2.95 mm to 6.05 mm in width, and 0.65 mm to 1.25 mm in thickness. Imports of rectangular wire are provided for under HTSUS categories 7605.19.0000, 7604.29.1090, or 7616.99.5190.
  • Also excluded from the scope of these investigations is certain rectangular wire, imported in bulk rolls or precut strips and produced from continuously cast rolled aluminum wire rod, which is subsequently extruded to dimension to form rectangular wire with or without rounded edges. The product is made from aluminum alloy grade 1070 or 1370, with no recycled metal content allowed. The dimensions of the wire are 2.95 mm to 6.05 mm in width, and 0.65 mm to 1.25 mm in thickness. Imports of rectangular wire are provided for under HTSUS categories 7605.19.0000, 7604.29.1090, or 7616.99.5190.
  • Imports of the subject merchandise, including subject merchandise entered as parts of other products, may also be classifiable under the following additional HTSUS categories, as well as other HTSUS categories: 6603.90.8100, 7606.12.3091, 7606.12.3096, 7615.10.2015, 7615.10.2025, 7615.10.3015, 7615.10.3025, 7615.10.5020, 7615.10.5040, 7615.10.7125, 7615.10.7130, 7615.10.7155, 7615.10.7180, 7615.10.9100, 7615.20.0000, 7616.10.9090, 7616.99.1000, 7616.99.5130, 7616.99.5140, 7616.99.5190, 8302.10.3000, 8302.10.6030, 8302.10.6060, 8302.10.6090, 8302.20.0000, 8302.30.3010, 8302.30.3060, 8302.41.3000, 8302.41.6015, 8302.41.6045, 8302.41.6050, 8302.41.6080, 8302.42.3010, 8302.42.3015, 8302.42.3065, 8302.49.6035, 8302.49.6045, 8302.49.6055, 8302.49.6085, 8302.50.0000, 8302.60.9000, 8305.10.0050, 8306.30.0000, 8414.59.6590, 8415.90.8045, 8418.99.8005, 8418.99.8050, 8418.99.8060, 8419.50.5000, 8419.90.1000, 8422.90.0640, 8424.90.9080, 8473.30.2000, 8473.30.5100, 8479.89.9599, 8479.90.8500, 8479.90.9596, 8481.90.9060, 8481.90.9085, 8486.90.0000, 8487.90.0080, 8503.00.9520, 8508.70.0000, 8513.90.2000, 8515.90.2000, 8516.90.5000, 8516.90.8050, 8517.71.0000, 8517.79.0000, 8529.90.7300, 8529.90.9760, 8536.90.8585, 8538.10.0000, 8541.90.0000, 8543.90.8885, 8708.10.3050, 8708.29.5160, 8708.80.6590, 8708.99.6890, 9013.90.8000, 9031.90.9195, 9401.99.9081, 9403.91.0005, 9403.91.0010, 9403.91.0080, 9403.99.1085, 9403.99.2040, 9403.99.2080, 9403.99.3080, 9403.99.4004, 9403.99.4010, 9403.99.5010, 9403.99.5080, 9403.99.9010, 9403.99.9040, 9403.99.9045, 9403.99.9051, 9506.11.4080, 9506.51.4000, 9506.51.6000, 9506.91.0010, 9506.91.0020, 9506.91.0030, 9506.99.0530, 9506.99.1500, 9506.99.2000, 9506.99.5500, 9506.99.6080, 9507.30.2000, 9507.30.8000, 9507.90.6000, and 9603.90.8050.
  • Preliminary determinations are due by November 20, 2023.
  • Compliance will inform affected customers directly.

FY2023 Q3

On July 12, 2023,  a petition was filed to initiate Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations on Certain Pea Proteins from China.

  • Please see the announcement in the Federal Register: Certain Pea Protein from China; Institution of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase.
  • The product within the scope of these investigations is high protein content (“HPC”) pea protein, which is a protein derived from peas (including, but not limited to, yellow field peas and green field peas) and which contains more than 65 percent protein on a dry weight basis.
  • Subject HPC pea protein may also be identified as pea protein concentrate, pea protein isolate, hydrolyzed pea protein, pea peptides, and fermented pea protein.
  • HPC pea protein, has the Chemical Abstracts Service (“CAS”) registry number 222400-29-5.
  • The investigation covers HPC pea protein in all physical forms including liquid and powder regardless of packaging.
  • The scope includes HPC pea protein described above that is blended, combined, or mixed with non-subject pea protein or with other products, including, but not limited to, protein powders, dry beverage blends, and protein fortified beverages. For any such blended, combined, or mixed products, only the HPC pea protein component is covered by the scope of these investigations.
  • HPC pea protein that has been blended, combined, or mixed with other products is included within the scope, regardless of whether the blending, combining, or mixing occurs in third countries.
  • HPC pea protein that is otherwise within the scope is covered when commingled (i.e., blended, combined, or mixed) with HPC pea protein from sources not subject to this investigation. Only the subject component of the commingled product is covered by the scope.
  • Excluded from the scope are any blend, combination, or mixture if the total HPC pea protein content of the blend, combination, or mixture (regardless of the source or sources) comprises less than 5 percent of the blend, combination, or mixture on a dry weight basis.
  • This merchandise is currently classifiable under HTS 3504.00.1000, 3504.00.5000, 2106.10.0000, and 2308.00.9890.
  • Preliminary determinations are due by August 28, 2023.

FY2023 Q2

On May 31, 2023,  a petition was filed to initiate Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations on Paper Shopping Bags from Cambodia, China, Columbia, India, Malaysia, Portugal, Taiwan, Turkey, and Vietnam.

  • The announcement of this investigation has not been published in the Federal Register. However, please see the United States International Trade Commission Investigation Notice for Paper Shopping Bags from Cambodia, China, Columbia, India, Malaysia, Portugal, Taiwan, Turkey, and Vietnam.
  • The products within the scope of these investigations are paper shopping bags with handles of any type, regardless of whether there is any printing, regardless of how the top edges are finished (e.g., folded, serrated, or otherwise), and regardless of whether the tops can be sealed.
  • Subject paper shopping bags have a width of at least 4.5 inches and depth of at least 2.5 inches.
  • Excluded from the scope are:
  • Multiwall sacks and bags;
  • Paper sacks or bags that are of a 1/6 or 1/7 barrel size (i.e., 11.5-12.5 inches in width, 6.5-7.5 inches in depth, and 13.5-17.5 inches in height) with flat paper handles;
  • Paper sacks or bags with die-cut handles, a standard basis paper weight of less than 38 pounds, and a height of less than 11.5 inches;
  • Shopping bags (i) with non-paper handles made wholly of woven ribbon or other similar woven fabric and (ii) that are finished with folded tops or for which tied knots or t-bar aglets (made of wood, metal, or plastic) are used to secure the handles to the bags; and
  • Gift bags marked for retail sale that are physically bundled into the saleable unit prior to importation such that each bundled unit is composed of no less than three individual bags and no more than 30 individual bags.
  • This merchandise is currently classifiable under HTS 4819.30.0040 and 4819.40.0040.
  • Preliminary determinations are due by July 17, 2023.

On April 27, 2023, a petition was filed to initiate an Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duty Investigation on Certain Non-Refillable Cylinders from India.

  • Federal Register: Non-Refillable Steel Cylinders from India – Institution of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations.
  • The merchandise covered by the petition are certain seamed (welded or brazed), non-refillable steel cylinders meeting the requirements of, or produced to meet the requirements of U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 39, TransportCanada Specification 39M, or United Nations pressure receptacle standard ISO 11118 and otherwise meeting the description below.
  • Certain non-refillable steel cylinders are portable and range from 100-cubic inch (1.6 Liter) water capacity to 1,526-cubic inch (25 Liter) water capacity.
  • Subject non-refillable steel cylinders may be imported with or without a valve and/or pressure release device and are unfilled at the time of importation.
  • Non-refillable steel cylinders filled with pressurized air otherwise meeting the physical description above are covered by these orders.
  • Specifically excluded are seamless non-refillable steel cylinders.
  • Preliminary determination is due by June 9, 2023.

On April 27, 2023,  a petition was filed to initiate an Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duty Investigation on Brass Rod from Brazil, India, Israel, Mexico, South Africa, and South Korea.

  • Federal Register: Brass Rod from Brazil, India, Israel, Mexico, South Africa, and South Korea – Institution of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations.
  • Brass rod, which is defined as leaded, low-lead and no-lead solid brass made from alloys such as, but not limited to: Alloys C36000, C37700, C3700, C36300, C27450, C69300, C35300, C34500, C67600, C35330, C48500, and C67300, and their international equivalents.
  • The brass rod subject to these orders have a cross-section greater than one quarter of one inch (0.25 inches) outside diameter but less than or equal to 12 inches outside diameter.
  • Brass rod cross-sections may be round, hexagonal, square, or octagonal shapes as well as special profiles (e.g., angles, shapes).
  • Standard leaded brass rod covered by the scope contains, by weight, 57.0 – 65.0 percent copper; 1.5 – 3.0 percent lead; no more than 0.35 percent iron; and at least 15 percent zinc.
  • No-lead or low-lead brass rod covered by the scope contains by weight 59.0- 76.0 percent copper; 0 – 1.5 percent lead; no more than 0.35 percent iron; and at least 15 percent zinc.
  • Brass rod may also include other elements.
  • Brass rod can be finished or unfinished.
  • Brass rod may be produced in accordance with ASTM Bl 6, ASTM B124, ASTM B981, ASTM B371, ASTM B453, ASTM B21, ASTM B138, and ASTM B927, but such conformity to an ASTM standard is not required for the merchandise to be included within the scope.
  • Brass rod is produced by melting and casting into billets or strand casting into rod.
  • Brass rod may or may not be heated, extruded, pickled, or cold-drawn.
  • Preliminary determination is due by June 12, 2023.

On April 25, 2023,  a petition was filed to initiate an Anti-dumping Duty Investigation on Boltless Steel Shelving Units Prepackaged for Sale from India, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam.

  • Federal Register:: Boltless Steel Shelving Units Prepackaged for Sale from India, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam – Institution of Antidumping Investigation.
  • The below scope information was taken from the Antidumping Order for Boltless Steel Shelving Units from China. The scope language could change in this investigation.
  • Boltless Steel shelving units are provided for in subheading 9403.20.0075 in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS).
  • The investigation covers boltless steel shelving prepackaged for sale, with or without decks.
  • The term “prepackaged for sale means” at the minimum, the steel vertical supports and horizontal supports necessary to assemble a completed shelving unit are packaged together for ultimate purchase by the end-user.
  • The term ”boltless” refers to steel shelving in which the vertical and horizontal supports forming the frame are assembled primarily without the use of nuts, bolts, or screws.
  • The term “deck” refers to the shelf that sits on or fits into the horizontal supports (beams or braces) to provide the horizontal storage surface of the shelving unit.
  • The vertical and horizontal support members for boltless steel shelving are assembled by methods such as, but not limited to, fitting a rivet, punched or cut tab or other similar connector on one support into a hole, slot, or similar receptacle on another support. The supports lock together to form the frame for the shelving unit and provide the structural integrity of the shelving unit separate from the inclusion of any decking.
  • The incidental use of nuts and bolts or screws to add accessories, wall anchors, tie-bars or shelf supports does not remove the product from scope.
  • Boltless steel shelving units may also come packaged as partially assembled, such as when two upright supports are welded together with front-to-back supports or are otherwise connected, to form an end unit for the frame.
  • The scope also includes add-on kits. Add-on kits include, but are not limited to, kits that allow the end-user to add an extension shelving unit onto an existing boltless steel shelving unit such that the extension and the original unit will share common frame elements (ex. two posts).
  • The boltless steel shelving covered by this petition may be commonly described as rivet shelving, welded frame shelving, slot and tab shelving, and punched rivet shelving as well as by other trade names.
  • Goods excluded from the scope include:
    1. Wall-mounted shelving, defined as shelving that is hung on the wall and does not stand on, or transfer load to, the floor (The addition of a wall bracket or other device to attach otherwise freestanding subject merchandise to a wall does not meet the terms of this exclusion.)
    2. Wire shelving units, which consist of shelves made from wire that incorporate both a wire deck and wire horizontal supports (taking the place of the horizontal beams and braces) into a single piece of tubular collars that slide over the posts and onto plastic sleeves snapped on the posts to create the finished shelving unit.
    3. Bulk-packed parts or components of boltless shelving units
    4. Made to order shelving units.
  • Preliminary determination is due by June 09, 2023.

On April 12, 2023, Commerce issued affirmative preliminary determinations in the below Circumvention Inquires:

  1. Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe completed in Vietnam from China origin Hot Rolled Steel were circumventing the Antidumping and Countervailing order on Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe from China. Cases A-552-009/C-552-010 (Original Case Number A-570-910 and C-570-911)

Federal Register: Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe completed in Vietnam from China origin Hot Rolled Steel

  1. Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe completed in Vietnam using Korea origin Hot Rolled Steel were circumventing the Antidumping order on Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipes from Korea. Case –

Case A-552-011 (Original Case Number A-580-809)

Federal Register: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe completed in Vietnam using Korea origin Hot Rolled Steel

  1. Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes completed in Vietnam using Indian origin Hot Rolled Steel were circumventing the Antidumping order Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes from India. Case – A-552-012 (Original Case Number A-533-502)

Federal Register: Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes completed in Vietnam using Indian origin Hot Rolled Steel

  • Suspension of liquidation and cash deposit requirements will apply to all unliquidated entries that were entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption on or after August 04, 2022.
  • Cash deposit for Case A-552-009: 85.55%
  • Cash deposit for Case C-552-010: 39.01%
  • Cash deposit for Case A-552-011: 4.80%
  • Cash deposit for Case A-552-012: 7.08%
  • Certifications are required to be filled out by the exporter and the importer verifying that the merchandise was produced from non-origin China, non-origin Korea, and non-origin India hot rolled steel. If there is no certification provided for an entry, antidumping and countervailing orders from three countries (China, India, and Korea) could potentially apply to that entry.
  • For entries during the period of August 04, 2022 – April 12, 2023, for which certifications are required and certifications were not submitted, importer and exporter certifications must be completed, signed, and dated no later than May 27, 2023.
  • If the required certifications for an entry were not submitted as part of the entry process, the required certifications from the importer and exporter must be submitted to CBP (Customs).
  • For entries going forward for these items or other items that would possibly be subject to these cases, the importer and exporter certifications are required to be submitted as to CBP as part of the entry package.
  • The importer and exporter are required to maintain sufficient documentation supporting their certifications.
  • The importer and exporter are required to maintain the certifications and supporting documentation for the later of (1) the date that is five years after the latest entry date of the entries covered by the certification; or (2) the date that is three years after the conclusion of any litigation in United States courts regarding such entries.
  • The exporter certification should be completed by the party selling the merchandise manufactured in Vietnam, which is not necessarily the producer of the product.

FY2023 Q1


Intellectual Property Rights

IPR stands for Intellectual Property Rights and refers to the legal rights and protections granted to individuals or entities for their creations or inventions. These creations can include inventions, designs, logos, brand names, software code, artistic works, trade secrets, and more. The CBP has put some serious emphasis on IPR seizures in recent years totaling over $2.5 billion annually since 2021.

IPR Seizure Data Chart
IPR Seizure Data Chart

In the supply chain context, IPR compliance is essential for businesses to protect their intellectual property assets and ensure that they aren’t being infringed upon or misused by other parties within the supply chain. Here are some key aspects of IPR in supply chain compliance:

  1. Counterfeit Goods: IPR compliance helps prevent the manufacture, distribution, or sale of counterfeit products that imitate and infringe on the trademarks, patents, or copyrights of legitimate products. Counterfeit goods can harm the reputation of a brand and lead to financial losses.
  2. Licensing and Royalties: When a company licenses its intellectual property to other parties for use or distribution, IPR compliance ensures that the terms of the licensing agreement are followed, and appropriate royalties or fees are paid.
  3. Supply Chain Partners: Businesses must ensure that their supply chain partners, such as suppliers and manufacturers, respect and protect their intellectual property rights. This may involve contractual agreements and regular audits to verify compliance.
  4. Data and Software Protection: In supply chains involving digital products or software, IPR compliance helps safeguard against unauthorized copying, distribution, or modification of copyrighted materials or proprietary software.
  5. International IPR Laws: Supply chains often span multiple countries, each with its own set of intellectual property laws and regulations. IPR compliance requires businesses to understand and adhere to these laws in the regions where they operate.
  6. Due Diligence: Conducting due diligence on potential supply chain partners is crucial to ensure that they have a track record of IPR compliance and are committed to protecting intellectual property rights.
  7. Dispute Resolution: In case of IPR infringement or disputes within the supply chain, businesses should have appropriate mechanisms in place for resolution, which may involve mediation, arbitration, or legal action.

Maintaining IPR compliance in the supply chain helps businesses protect their valuable innovations, brands, and creative works, promoting fair competition and fostering an environment where creativity and innovation can thrive. It also reduces the risk of legal challenges, financial losses, and reputational damage associated with intellectual property violations. 



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